Methamphetamine (meth), More Dangerous Than You Think

The Japanese first created methamphetamine in the late 19th century. In 1943, meth was commercially made by Abbott Laboratories for the treatment of narcolepsy, depression and even as a treatment for alcoholism. Today, the drug is only approved for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or, in some cases, obesity.

Historical documents show that meth’s earliest uses were during World War II when it was given to both the Allied Forces and the German military. There is some evidence that Hitler’s physician have him meth in intravenous injections, which may account for some of his hysterical actions.

By the 1980s, Americans had learned how to manufacture their own brand of methamphetamines by using over-the-counter cold medications and other household chemicals. This led to the passing of laws in the United States to prohibit the possession of the precursors and equipment related to meth abuse methamphetamine production.

It is easy to notice that American society today is drawn to drugs and drinks that increase one’s normal energy levels. Some project that it is a symptom of a society that is expecting too much of themselves and others say that it is related to the malaise felt by many that are consuming unhealthy junk foods and need stimulates to counteract their sick metabolism.

Whatever the reasons for this surge in seeking stimulants, meth has become a more acceptable “middle-class” options than ever seen in the past. It isn’t uncommon to find successful professionals that are taking meth daily to sustain their level of activity. They know that if they reduce or stop their use of the drug, they will immediately begin need days of sleep and rest to recover from the stress that they have chemically forced their bodies and, especially their nervous systems, to operate under.

When a person first uses meth in average doses, it is very enticing because it makes you feel that you are unstoppable and feel that you are in your “A-game”. In reality, people on meth have the feeling that they are excelling, but their actual intelligence is suppressed, leaving them less capable than they believe. Once they have pushed their systems to operate in over-drive, they are inevitably going to pay the consequences of feeling the opposite as the body attempts to come back to a normal operating basis.

Most people can’t tolerate depression meth abuse for very long periods of time and even a few days of being depressed seem intolerable. For this reason, it is very easy for someone to “medicate” away his or her lethargy and depression by taking another dose of meth, and many times a larger dose. This, of course, is just putting the depression on hold because there will become a time when the body must rest and the depression must be confronted.

It doesn’t take must imagination to picture how taking meth can easily lead to a need for the addictive use of the drug. Because meth is pushing the body to operate in extreme, one’s nutrition suffers and the chemical balance of the body is disrupted. This leads to many health and dental problems that can only be prevented by restoring the nutritional base and getting ample rest. Meth does, indeed, kill and it does so while the user believes that all is well. A strong prevention meth abuse message is vital to protect our public from escalating their use of energy-drinks to meth without knowing the dangers.

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